Cutlery and Electrical Sockets

59,674 notes

quiet-knives:

PSA: because I keep seeing that shitty manipulated photo of Emma Watson on my dash. THAT PHOTO WAS PHOTOSHOPPED.  The original photo (with another from the same shoot, is from 2011 with Mariano Vivanco) are pictured above. Please don’t perpetuate this error. 

Deliberately spreading an altered image of Emma Watson which purports to show her breasts as a statement against threats of nude photo leaks is the height of hypocrisy and whoever did it should be ashamed. (x)

(via iguanamouth)

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fabulouslyfreespirited:

‘Inspirational’ former Australian Prime Minister Gough Whitlam has died, aged 98
FORMER prime minister Gough Whitlam, who died this morning aged 98, has been hailed as “a giant” of Australian politics who “inspired a legion of young people” to reform the nation.
Mr Whitlam led Australia for three turbulent years from 1972, launching sweeping reforms of the nation’s economic and cultural affairs, until his dismissal by the governor-general John Kerr amid a constitutional crisis in 1975.
His controversial reforms included early recognition of Aboriginal land rights, normalisation of diplomatic ties with China, universal health care, universal access to university, no-fault divorce, and the end of conscription and withdrawal of forces from Vietnam.
Mr Whitlam’s children – Antony, Nicholas and Stephen Whitlam and Catherine Dovey – said in a statement: “A loving and generous father, he was a source of inspiration to us and our families and for millions of Australians.”
There will be a private cremation and public memorial service, the statement said.
Tony Abbott has directed all flags be flown at half-mast in honour of Mr Whitlam, whom we described as “a giant of his time” who “inspired a legion of young people to get involved in public life”.
“He established diplomatic relations with China and was the first Australian Prime Minister to visit China. China is our largest trading partner. That is an enduring legacy.
“Gough Whitlam recognised the journey that our country needed to take with indigenous Australians. The image of soil passing from Gough Whitlam’s hand to Vincent Lingiari’s is a reminder that all Australians share the same land and the same hopes.
“Gough Whitlam’s life was inseparable from that of Margaret Whitlam. Margaret Whitlam was a leading light for women of her generation. Together they made a difference to our country.”
Mr Whitlam’s wife, Margaret Whitlam, passed away in March 2012.
Opposition Leader Bill Shorten said the Labor Party had “lost a giant” and “the nation has lost a legend”.
“Like no other prime minister before or since, Gough Whitlam redefined our country and in doing so he changed the lives of a generation. His vision, his ambition offered Australia a new sense of what it might be,” Mr Shorten said.
“Our country is different because of him. By any test, the country is different and by any test the country was different significantly and better.
“He reimagined Australia as a modern nation where equality of opportunity belonged to all. There will be millions of Australians who feel his loss and will mourn his passing in the days to come.”
Julia Gillard, prime minister between 2010 and 2013, said Mr Whitlam remained alive in his reforms and the lives that were changed for the better.
“He is alive in our universities and the many lives he changed by giving free access to university education, my life included in that count. Alive in Medicare and the uniquely Australian health system we now take for granted. Alive in our suburbs and in our family law. Alive in our relationship with China and our multicultural society. Alive in our embrace of land rights for Indigenous Australians and our hope for a truly reconciled future,” Ms Gillard told Guardian Australia.
“Gough is alive in today’s Labor party, too. We celebrate his government’s triumphs and never forget the hard lessons learned from the mistakes.
“Every Labor leader and every prime minister who has followed him has wrestled with his legacy. Gough Whitlam transformed so much about Australia and the prime ministership.”
Labor deputy leader Tanya Plibersek, in a tearful interview on Sky News, said Mr Whitlam’s most controversial policies had become “absolutely embedded in our national history and character”.
“The lesson, I suppose, is those brave policy decisions which have set Australia on a better course should inspire us to bravery today as well, to make those tough decisions to stand up and argue for the things that we believe in – things that we know can make our nation stronger,” Ms Plibersek said.
“He was a loving and generous figure in the Labor Party as well… He was so generous with his time and his advice, it always felt like a real thrill as a young person moving into a position of responsibility in the Labor Party actually to be able to go and see Gough Whitlam and say ‘what do you think about these issues?’, ‘can you tell us a bit more about the history?’”
Veteran Labor strategist Bruce Hawker, on Twitter, described Mr Whitlam as “a giant in every sense of the word”.
“He inspired a generation and transformed his party, changing the nation forever,” Mr Hawker wrote.
Greens leader Christine Milne wrote Mr Whitlam’s death marked “a very sad day” for Australia.
“He was a larger-than-life figure whose leadership profoundly changed the nation for the better,” Senator Milne wrote.
Former Victorian Liberal premier Jeff Kennett described Mr Whitlam as his “comrade”.
“A giant of a man, committed to the return of the Elgin Marbles to Greece. A friend with a great sense of humour,” Mr Kennett also wrote on Twitter.
Source: The Australian
**************************Bloggers note: This is a sad day for Australia. This man truly changed our country for the better. There aren’t many around like him.
May he rest in peace.

fabulouslyfreespirited:

‘Inspirational’ former Australian Prime Minister Gough Whitlam has died, aged 98

FORMER prime minister Gough Whitlam, who died this morning aged 98, has been hailed as “a giant” of Australian politics who “inspired a legion of young people” to reform the nation.

Mr Whitlam led Australia for three turbulent years from 1972, launching sweeping reforms of the nation’s economic and cultural affairs, until his dismissal by the governor-general John Kerr amid a constitutional crisis in 1975.

His controversial reforms included early recognition of Aboriginal land rights, normalisation of diplomatic ties with China, universal health care, universal access to university, no-fault divorce, and the end of conscription and withdrawal of forces from Vietnam.

Mr Whitlam’s children – Antony, Nicholas and Stephen Whitlam and Catherine Dovey – said in a statement: “A loving and generous father, he was a source of inspiration to us and our families and for millions of Australians.”

There will be a private cremation and public memorial service, the statement said.

Tony Abbott has directed all flags be flown at half-mast in honour of Mr Whitlam, whom we described as “a giant of his time” who “inspired a legion of young people to get involved in public life”.

“He established diplomatic relations with China and was the first Australian Prime Minister to visit China. China is our largest trading partner. That is an enduring legacy.

“Gough Whitlam recognised the journey that our country needed to take with indigenous Australians. The image of soil passing from Gough Whitlam’s hand to Vincent Lingiari’s is a reminder that all Australians share the same land and the same hopes.

“Gough Whitlam’s life was inseparable from that of Margaret Whitlam. Margaret Whitlam was a leading light for women of her generation. Together they made a difference to our country.”

Mr Whitlam’s wife, Margaret Whitlam, passed away in March 2012.

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten said the Labor Party had “lost a giant” and “the nation has lost a legend”.

“Like no other prime minister before or since, Gough Whitlam redefined our country and in doing so he changed the lives of a generation. His vision, his ambition offered Australia a new sense of what it might be,” Mr Shorten said.

“Our country is different because of him. By any test, the country is different and by any test the country was different significantly and better.

“He reimagined Australia as a modern nation where equality of opportunity belonged to all. There will be millions of Australians who feel his loss and will mourn his passing in the days to come.”

Julia Gillard, prime minister between 2010 and 2013, said Mr Whitlam remained alive in his reforms and the lives that were changed for the better.

“He is alive in our universities and the many lives he changed by giving free access to university education, my life included in that count. Alive in Medicare and the uniquely Australian health system we now take for granted. Alive in our suburbs and in our family law. Alive in our relationship with China and our multicultural society. Alive in our embrace of land rights for Indigenous Australians and our hope for a truly reconciled future,” Ms Gillard told Guardian Australia.

“Gough is alive in today’s Labor party, too. We celebrate his government’s triumphs and never forget the hard lessons learned from the mistakes.

“Every Labor leader and every prime minister who has followed him has wrestled with his legacy. Gough Whitlam transformed so much about Australia and the prime ministership.”

Labor deputy leader Tanya Plibersek, in a tearful interview on Sky News, said Mr Whitlam’s most controversial policies had become “absolutely embedded in our national history and character”.

“The lesson, I suppose, is those brave policy decisions which have set Australia on a better course should inspire us to bravery today as well, to make those tough decisions to stand up and argue for the things that we believe in – things that we know can make our nation stronger,” Ms Plibersek said.

“He was a loving and generous figure in the Labor Party as well… He was so generous with his time and his advice, it always felt like a real thrill as a young person moving into a position of responsibility in the Labor Party actually to be able to go and see Gough Whitlam and say ‘what do you think about these issues?’, ‘can you tell us a bit more about the history?’”

Veteran Labor strategist Bruce Hawker, on Twitter, described Mr Whitlam as “a giant in every sense of the word”.

“He inspired a generation and transformed his party, changing the nation forever,” Mr Hawker wrote.

Greens leader Christine Milne wrote Mr Whitlam’s death marked “a very sad day” for Australia.

“He was a larger-than-life figure whose leadership profoundly changed the nation for the better,” Senator Milne wrote.

Former Victorian Liberal premier Jeff Kennett described Mr Whitlam as his “comrade”.

“A giant of a man, committed to the return of the Elgin Marbles to Greece. A friend with a great sense of humour,” Mr Kennett also wrote on Twitter.

Source: The Australian

**************************
Bloggers note: This is a sad day for Australia. This man truly changed our country for the better. There aren’t many around like him.

May he rest in peace.